I See You

She was a girl in a time when lipstick and perfect hemlines were of great importance,

When little women mimicked flawlessly-coiffed hairdos and pressed blouses, learned from their mothers and fashionable aunts

She followed all of the rules, and showed off all of her potential as a perfect little mother to perfect little siblings,

Validation was born of faultless pin curls and stainless sheets; of exquisite pies and unflappable emotion.

And somehow it never felt enough.

She came of age in a time that flipped everything she had ever learned upside down, and so began a life lived in seemingly vain-attempt to bridge these two worlds.

She lived in silent protest

To justify her desire for something more.

She married because she was supposed to

Thought better of it and took her first brave step on her own.

She saw skies that were too bright, and made the rules as she went along

Fell in love and bore children; torn between staying at home and working

Was a perfect hostess and textbook mother

Indulged in creativity, and the real-world as a classroom.

And somehow it never seemed enough

All the black sheep that she held, by birthright should have never been hers

But she was forever misunderstood.

She never quite fit into one world or the other,

Trying to please everyone; wanting more for herself

She realized that someday never comes.

And it wasn’t by accident, this brave ascent into unexpected adventurousness.

It took years for her to decide that if she wasn’t appreciated where she was

She would find her own niche; look elsewhere for people waiting all their lives for her with open arms; and live exactly where she was meant to be.

Without judgement

She remains misunderstood by those that once thought they knew her best,

But she leaves a mark wherever she goes despite everything everyone ever knew of her

She no longer waits for validation, because it occurred to her that she was always beautiful.

And she finally believes she is worth it.

2 thoughts on “I See You

  1. Ginette Atkinson

    Are you not posting these on facebook any more. Where do we leave comments? I don’t see any at the end of this. By the way, I can totally relate to the description of this woman. I too, married at 19 and thought better of it. You describe my upbringing and generation quite well. Coiffed hairdos and pressed blouses, hostess and creativity, following the rules, that’s me for sure. Your insight is uncanny.

    Date: Fri, 28 Feb 2014 01:14:08 +0000 To: ginlis@bell.net

    Reply

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